images links abstract
Wiki Code Copy Tips Home

Iceland

Iceland (Icelandic: Ísland; [ˈistlant] (listen)) is a Nordic island country in the North Atlantic, with a population of 360,390 and an area of 103,000 km2 (40,000 sq mi), making it the most sparsely populated country in Europe. The capital and largest city is Reykjavík, with Reykjavík and the surrounding areas in the southwest of the country being home to over two-thirds of the population. Iceland is volcanically and geologically active. The interior consists of a plateau characterised by sand and lava fields, mountains, and glaciers, and many glacial rivers flow to the sea through the lowlands. Iceland is warmed by the Gulf Stream and has a temperate climate, despite a high latitude almost entirely outside the Arctic Circle. Its high latitude and marine influence keep summers chilly, with most of the archipelago having a tundra climate.

According to the ancient manuscript Landnámabók, the settlement of Iceland began in 874 AD when the Norwegian chieftain Ingólfr Arnarson became the first permanent settler on the island. In the following centuries, Norwegians, and to a lesser extent other Scandinavians, emigrated to Iceland, bringing with them thralls (i.e., slaves or serfs) of Gaelic origin.

The island was governed as an independent commonwealth under the Althing, one of the world's oldest functioning legislative assemblies. Following a period of civil strife, Iceland acceded to Norwegian rule in the 13th century. The establishment of the Kalmar Union in 1397 united the kingdoms of Norway, Denmark, and Sweden. Iceland thus followed Norway's integration into that union, coming under Danish rule after Sweden's secession from the union in 1523. Although the Danish kingdom introduced Lutheranism forcefully in 1550, Iceland remained a distant semi-colonial territory in which Danish institutions and infrastructures were conspicuous by their absence.

In the wake of the French Revolution and the Napoleonic Wars, Iceland's struggle for independence took form and culminated in independence in 1918 and the founding of a republic in 1944. Although its parliament (Althing) was suspended from 1799 to 1845, the island republic has been credited with sustaining the world's oldest and longest-running parliament.

Until the 20th century, Iceland relied largely on subsistence fishing and agriculture. Industrialisation of the fisheries and Marshall Plan aid following World War II brought prosperity and Iceland became one of the wealthiest and most developed nations in the world. In 1994, it became a part of the European Economic Area, which further diversified the economy into sectors such as finance, biotechnology, and manufacturing.

Iceland has a market economy with relatively low taxes, compared to other OECD countries, as well as the highest trade union membership in the world. It maintains a Nordic social welfare system that provides universal health care and tertiary education for its citizens. Iceland ranks high in economic, democratic, social stability, and equality, currently ranking first in the world by median wealth per adult. In 2018, it was ranked as the sixth most developed country in the world by the United Nations' Human Development Index, and it ranks first on the Global Peace Index. Iceland runs almost completely on renewable energy.

Hit hard by the worldwide financial crisis, the nation's entire banking system systemically failed in October 2008, leading to a severe depression, substantial political unrest, the Icesave dispute, and the institution of capital controls. Some bankers were jailed. Since then, the economy has made a significant recovery, in large part due to a surge in tourism. A law that took effect in 2018 makes it illegal in Iceland for women to be paid less than men.

Icelandic culture is founded upon the nation's Scandinavian heritage. Most Icelanders are descendants of Norse and Gaelic settlers. Icelandic, a North Germanic language, is descended from Old West Norse and is closely related to Faroese. The country's cultural heritage includes traditional Icelandic cuisine, Icelandic literature, and medieval sagas. Iceland has the smallest population of any NATO member and is the only one with no standing army, with a lightly armed coast guard.



Source: Iceland
2017 ATP World Tour
Polar bear
Kit Harington
Edward IV of England
Ayn Rand
Radiohead
Martin Freeman
Anderson Cooper
Jacqueline Fernandez
Gulf War
Christopher Darden
List of United States stand-up comedians
The Sound of Music (film)
Rebecca Hall
Dan Aykroyd
Lupita Nyong'o
Lauren Cohan
William Henry Harrison
Ronnie O'Sullivan
Bea Arthur
Neil Armstrong
Aaron Rodgers
Valentine's Day
P. T. Barnum
Tokyo Ghoul
Indo-European languages
Bookmark
Sully (film)
Chuck Norris
Bebe Rexha
Harvard University
Volleyball
The Conjuring (film series)
Hanging Gardens of Babylon
How I Met Your Mother
Paul Simon
Lea Michele
M. Night Shyamalan
Agoraphobia
Adderall
Jessica Chastain
Capitalism
Georgina Chapman
Eddie Murphy
Martin Shkreli
2017 NBA draft
Dolphin
Sean Spicer
Nikola Tesla
Open education
Oasis (band)
Chronic traumatic encephalopathy
Los Angeles Rams
Ansel Adams
Bill O'Reilly (political commentator)
La La Land (film)
Jenna Dewan
Croatia
Ed Westwick
Finding Dory
Al-Bassa
Boy George
Yolanda Hadid
Paul Bettany
Feminism
Song Hye-kyo
Mac Miller
Nintendo Switch
Audie Murphy
Pink Floyd
Channel S
WWE
Memento (film)
Blackbeard
Mormons
Indian Railways
Jaundice
Barbra Streisand
Maria Sharapova
Inauguration of Donald Trump
Marxism
Tucker Carlson
Alprazolam
Joan Collins
Laurie Metcalf
Gemma Arterton
74th Golden Globe Awards
Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold
Manushi Chhillar
Zoe Kazan
Arthur Blank
Ant-Man (film)
Margaret Atwood
Twin Peaks (2017 TV series)
Transformers: Age of Extinction
SZA (singer)
The Maze Runner (film)
The Shawshank Redemption
Wes Anderson
Xbox One
Global warming
2018 in film
Charles Barkley
Turkey
Pennsylvania
Necrophilia
Albus Dumbledore
Obsessive–compulsive disorder
Atlético Madrid
Walmart
Tristan Thompson
Young Sheldon
Mount Everest
James Franco
Edward VI of England
Élodie Yung
Overwatch (video game)
Ann Coulter
Biology
John Wayne
Facebook
QR code
Brooklyn Nine-Nine
Ivy League
Star Wars sequel trilogy
Bolivia
Feud (TV series)
49, XXXXX
William the Conqueror
Bell's palsy
Jews
Zoey Deutch
Aditi Rao Hydari
Terry Crews
The Man in the High Castle
KGB
Joaquin Phoenix
Jane Austen
Pornography
Bangladesh
Charles Kushner
Kodak Black
Dirty Dancing
Split (2016 American film)
Snapchat
Costa Rica
69 (sex position)
List of Naruto: Shippuden episodes
Eric Trump
Miles Heizer
Mecca
United States Bill of Rights
List of mobile phone makers by country
Renée Zellweger
Aliens (film)
Hamilton (musical)
Michelle Rodriguez
2017 Manchester Arena bombing
Lolita
Studio Ghibli
Ellie Kemper
John Quincy Adams
Romanticism
Jeff Sessions
Louis Armstrong
Sarin
This Is Us (TV series)
Jefferson Davis
Alexander Graham Bell
John Malkovich
Raj Kapoor
Star Wars Rebels
Chloë Sevigny
Mauritius
Otto Warmbier
Sofía Vergara
Beauty and the Beast (1991 film)
Blue Bloods (TV series)
Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt
Bernie Sanders
China Netcom
Wil Wheaton
Debbie McGee
List of Telugu films of 2017
Nasty Gal
Andy Griffith
Bulgaria
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
Ryan Seacrest
Bruce Springsteen
Patriots Day (film)
RMS Titanic
Steve Bannon
Bahá'í Faith
Dominica
List of country calling codes
Charles Manson
Katharine Ross
Sally Field
Sudan
TIPS: To create new content for your website or blog...
  1. Enter the title of a Wikipedia article in the box above.
  2. Select your options using the checkboxes, or use default settings.
  3. Click the 'go' button to retrieve the article.
  4. Click the 'Copy Code' button to copy the source code of the article to your clipboard.
  5. Paste the source code into your favorite HTML editor.
  6. Edit the content to suit your needs.
  7. Publish your new content to your website or blog.
  8. IMPORTANT: Before publishing, be sure to make significant changes to avoid creating duplicate content.
buy this site
Custom Website Development