images links abstract
Wiki Code Copy Tips Home

British Empire

The British Empire comprised the dominions, colonies, protectorates, mandates and other territories ruled or administered by the United Kingdom and its predecessor states. It originated with the overseas possessions and trading posts established by England between the late 16th and early 18th centuries. At its height, it was the largest empire in history and, for over a century, was the foremost global power. By 1913, the British Empire held sway over 412 million people, 23% of the world population at the time, and by 1920, it covered 35,500,000 km2 (13,700,000 sq mi), 24% of the Earth's total land area. As a result, its political, legal, linguistic and cultural legacy is widespread. At the peak of its power, the phrase "the empire on which the sun never sets" was often used to describe the British Empire, because its expanse around the globe meant that the sun was always shining on at least one of its territories.

During the Age of Discovery in the 15th and 16th centuries, Portugal and Spain pioneered European exploration of the globe, and in the process established large overseas empires. Envious of the great wealth these empires generated, England, France, and the Netherlands began to establish colonies and trade networks of their own in the Americas and Asia. A series of wars in the 17th and 18th centuries with the Netherlands and France left England and then, following union between England and Scotland in 1707, Great Britain, the dominant colonial power in North America. It then became the dominant power in the Indian subcontinent after the East India Company's conquest of Mughal Bengal at the Battle of Plassey in 1757.

The independence of the Thirteen Colonies in North America in 1783 after the American War of Independence caused Britain to lose some of its oldest and most populous colonies. British attention soon turned towards Asia, Africa, and the Pacific. After the defeat of France in the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars (1792–1815), Britain emerged as the principal naval and imperial power of the 19th century. Unchallenged at sea, British dominance was later described as Pax Britannica ("British Peace"), a period of relative peace in Europe and the world (1815–1914) during which the British Empire became the global hegemon and adopted the role of global policeman. In the early 19th century, the Industrial Revolution began to transform Britain; so that by the time of the Great Exhibition in 1851, the country was described as the "workshop of the world". The British Empire expanded to include most of India, large parts of Africa and many other territories throughout the world. Alongside the formal control that Britain exerted over its own colonies, its dominance of much of world trade meant that it effectively controlled the economies of many regions, such as Asia and Latin America.

During the 19th century, Britain's population increased at a dramatic rate, accompanied by rapid urbanisation, which caused significant social and economic stresses. To seek new markets and sources of raw materials, the British government under Benjamin Disraeli initiated a period of imperial expansion in Egypt, South Africa, and elsewhere. Canada, Australia, and New Zealand became self-governing dominions.

By the start of the 20th century, Germany and the United States had begun to challenge Britain's economic lead. Subsequent military and economic tensions between Britain and Germany were major causes of the First World War, during which Britain relied heavily upon its empire. The conflict placed enormous strain on the military, financial and manpower resources of Britain. Although the British Empire achieved its largest territorial extent immediately after World War I, Britain was no longer the world's pre-eminent industrial or military power. In the Second World War, Britain's colonies in East and Southeast Asia were occupied by Japan. Despite the final victory of Britain and its allies, the damage to British prestige helped to accelerate the decline of the empire. India, Britain's most valuable and populous possession, achieved independence as part of a larger decolonisation movement in which Britain granted independence to most territories of the empire. The Suez Crisis confirmed Britain's decline as a global power. The transfer of Hong Kong to China in 1997 marked for many the end of the British Empire. Fourteen overseas territories remain under British sovereignty. After independence, many former British colonies joined the Commonwealth of Nations, a free association of independent states. The United Kingdom is now one of 16 Commonwealth nations, a grouping known informally as the Commonwealth realms, that share a monarch, currently Queen Elizabeth II.



Source: British Empire
Ronaldinho
Vagina
Stephen Fry
United States Senate
Tokyo
One-Punch Man
Benjamin Franklin
Maroon 5
MS-13
Nike, Inc.
John Wick: Chapter 2
Deshaun Watson
List of Fairy Tail episodes
Polycystic ovary syndrome
Laos
Laverne Cox
Iron Man (2008 film)
Ben Shapiro
List of Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States
Rwandan genocide
Elimination Chamber (2017)
Continent
Munna Michael
Emily Blunt
Mia Goth
Your Name
Cystic fibrosis
List of Jane the Virgin episodes
Viggo Mortensen
Monica Bellucci
2017 ATP World Tour
Desmond Doss
Daft Punk
Joe Manganiello
Bangladesh
National Basketball Association
List of highest-grossing films
Sarah Huckabee Sanders
Armenia
Atlanta (TV series)
Catherine the Great
Django Unchained
Paul Bettany
Adam Sandler
Bobby Moore
The Avengers (2012 film)
Donatella Versace
Pornography
Ozark (TV series)
Georgina Chapman
F. Scott Fitzgerald
Miles Teller
Lolita
Wilhelm II, German Emperor
Polar bear
Odell Beckham Jr.
The Handmaid's Tale (TV series)
Marvel Comics
Rita Hayworth
Pakistan
Vincent van Gogh
List of Prime Ministers of India
Net neutrality
Prague
2015 NBA draft
Henrietta Lacks
Wind River (film)
Shashi Kapoor
Captain Underpants: The First Epic Movie
Amanda Knox
Robert Griffin III
India
Dylann Roof
The Belko Experiment
Joan Crawford
John Wayne Gacy
Jessica Lange
Colin Firth
Kenneth Branagh
Justin Timberlake
Better Call Saul
Dulce María
Egypt
Vladimir Putin
Confederate States of America
Poland
New York (state)
Thanksgiving
Jenny Slate
Hypertension
IP address
Khalid (singer)
WWE Championship
Clitoris
Mumbai
List of Canadian stand-up comedians
Bruce Willis
Canary Islands
ABBA
Alzheimer's disease
Middle Ages
Moon Lovers: Scarlet Heart Ryeo
QR code
Mike Shinoda
Buddhism
The Golden Girls
NATO phonetic alphabet
Thierry Henry
Dragon Ball Z
Christopher Lee
Denzel Washington
A Series of Unfortunate Events
Busy Philipps
United Airlines
Taissa Farmiga
Roy Moore
Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.
Mike Pence
Kristen Wiig
Brunei
Tom and Jerry
United States House of Representatives
Kiss (band)
Ray Donovan
List of The Simpsons episodes
Carrie Underwood
While You Were Sleeping (2017 TV series)
Robert E. Lee
Louis XIV of France
Gadsden flag
Bollywood
Hypertext Transfer Protocol
Crohn's disease
Taxonomy (biology)
Slovenia
Lilith
Lily-Rose Depp
Theodore Roosevelt
Katrina Kaif
Final Fantasy XV
Medellín Cartel
T. J. Miller
Ask Laftan Anlamaz
Triple H
Simple Mail Transfer Protocol
The Last Ship (TV series)
Warren Beatty
List of Tamil films of 2017
Roe v. Wade
Lenny Kravitz
Joan of Arc
Machine Gun Kelly (rapper)
Vitamin B12
Test
Norse mythology
Empire (2015 TV series)
David Lynch
Jennifer Garner
Wladimir Klitschko
Eurovision Song Contest 2017
Missionary position
Dennis Rader
Chad Michael Murray
Vasyl Lomachenko
Cocaine
Hank Williams
Jaeden Lieberher
The Room (film)
Giovanni Ribisi
Beijing
Wentworth Miller
United States Senate special election in Alabama, 2017
HTML
Impeachment
Betty White
Manhattan Project
Grace Kelly
Family of Donald Trump
Fibromyalgia
Shakira
Moana (2016 film)
OSI model
No Country for Old Men (film)
Patrick Stewart
Cell (biology)
Olivia de Havilland
Reese Witherspoon
GBU-43/B Massive Ordnance Air Blast
Tibet
Independence Day: Resurgence
Rachel Maddow
Captain America: The First Avenger
DuckTales (2017 TV series)
SZA (singer)
Assassin's Creed
Spotify
London
Vietnam
Vince Vaughn
Rebecca Ferguson
TIPS: To create new content for your website or blog...
  1. Enter the title of a Wikipedia article in the box above.
  2. Select your options using the checkboxes, or use default settings.
  3. Click the 'go' button to retrieve the article.
  4. Click the 'Copy Code' button to copy the source code of the article to your clipboard.
  5. Paste the source code into your favorite HTML editor.
  6. Edit the content to suit your needs.
  7. Publish your new content to your website or blog.
  8. IMPORTANT: Before publishing, be sure to make significant changes to avoid creating duplicate content.
buy this site
Custom Website Development