images links abstract
Wiki Code Copy Tips Home

Alt-right

The alt-right, an abbreviation of alternative right, is a loosely connected far-right, white supremacist, white nationalist, white separatist, anti-immigration and sometimes antisemitic movement based in the United States. A largely online phenomenon, the alt-right originated in the U.S. during the 2010s although it has since established a presence in various other countries. The term is ill-defined, having been used in different ways by various self-described "alt-rightists", media commentators, and academics.

In 2010, the American white nationalist Richard B. Spencer launched The Alternative Right webzine to disseminate his ideas. Spencer's "alternative right" was influenced by earlier forms of American white nationalism, as well as paleoconservatism, the Dark Enlightenment, and the Nouvelle Droite. Critics charged it with being a rebranding of white supremacism. His term was shortened to "alt-right" and popularised by far-right participants of /pol/, the politics board of web forum 4chan. It came to be associated with other white nationalist websites and groups, including Andrew Anglin's Daily Stormer, Brad Griffin's Occidental Dissent, and Matthew Heimbach's Traditionalist Worker Party. Following the 2014 Gamergate controversy, the alt-right made increasing use of trolling and online harassment as a tactic to raise its profile. In 2015 it attracted broader public attention—particularly through coverage on Steve Bannon's Breitbart News—due to alt-right support for Donald Trump's 2016 presidential campaign. On being elected, Trump disavowed the movement. Attempting to move from an online-based to a street-based movement, Spencer and other alt-rightists organised the 2017 Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, which faced significant anti-fascist opposition. After this, the movement began to decline.

The alt-right is a white nationalist, biologically racist movement. Part of its membership supports anti-immigrationist policies to ensure a continued white majority in the United States. Others call for the breakup of the country to form a white separatist ethno-state in North America. Some alt-rightists seek to make white nationalism socially respectable in the U.S., while others—known as the "1488" scene—adopt openly white supremacist and neo-Nazi stances. Some alt-rightists are anti-semitic, promoting a conspiracy theory that there is a Jewish plot to bring about white genocide; other alt-rightists view most Jews as members of the white race. The alt-right is anti-feminist, advocates for a more patriarchal society, and intersects with the men's rights movement and other sectors of the online manosphere. Alt-rightists generally support anti-interventionist and isolationist foreign policies alongside economic protectionism and thus criticise mainstream U.S. conservatism. Attitudes to social issues like homosexuality and abortion vary within the movement. Individuals aligned with many of the alt-right's ideas but not its white nationalism have been termed "alt-lite".

The alt-right distinguished itself from earlier forms of white nationalism through its largely online presence and its heavy use of irony and humor, particularly through the promotion of Internet memes like Pepe the Frog. Membership was overwhelmingly white and male, with academic and anti-fascist observers linking its growth to deteriorating living standards and prospects, anxieties about the place of white masculinity, and anger at increasingly visible left-wing forms of identity politics like the Black Lives Matter movement. Constituent groups using the "alt-right" label have been characterised as hate groups, while alt-right material has been a contributing factor in the radicalization of young white men responsible for a range of far-right murders and terrorist attacks in the U.S. since 2014. Opposition to the alt-right has come from many areas of the political spectrum including socialists, liberals and conservatives.



Source: Alt-right
List of Presidents of the United States
Mars
Akkineni Nagarjuna
Ancient Rome
Tony Ferguson
Baahubali: The Beginning
France
Guy Ritchie
John Boyega
List of countries by population (United Nations)
Denis Villeneuve
Kajal Aggarwal
Whoopi Goldberg
Anno Domini
Zac Efron
North Carolina
California Proposition 218 (1996)
Morocco
Poisson distribution
Jurassic Park (film)
The Wolverine (film)
Stephen King
Meat Loaf
IPhone 7
Nicole Kidman
Edward VI of England
List of Pixar films
United States Senate
Billie Jean King
Michael Shannon
Dexter (TV series)
Manson Family
Mark David Chapman
Chile
BMW
Star Wars (film)
Soviet Union
Dak Prescott
Stranger Things (TV series)
Lyle and Erik Menendez
Justin Theroux
List of Homeland episodes
Roald Dahl
Destiny 2
Search engine optimization
Roger Waters
The Huntsman: Winter's War
Desmond Doss
13 Reasons Why
Liv Tyler
Sarin
XXXTentacion
Galileo Galilei
Charles Barkley
Sexual arousal
International Space Station
Copper
Ron Howard
Judi Dench
Facebook
Cities and towns during the Syrian Civil War
Cary Grant
Dancing with the Stars (U.S. season 25)
Anil Kapoor
Harvey Weinstein
Dirk Nowitzki
Sidharth Malhotra
Ernest Hemingway
Julius Caesar
Jaguar
Roanoke Colony
Gregg Allman
Albert, Prince Consort
Khalid (singer)
Don't Breathe
Survivor (U.S. TV series)
Chester Bennington
Mary Steenburgen
Michael B. Jordan
2017 in South Korean music
Michael Jackson
Monosodium glutamate
Johnny Cash
Second Amendment to the United States Constitution
Roy Halladay
Katey Sagal
Mark Strong
List of Vikings episodes
Gladiator (2000 film)
Catholic Church
Sylvester Stallone
Mark Wahlberg
Mahesh Babu
Emily V. Gordon
Jane Fonda
Metformin
Call of Duty: WWII
Bill Hader
Leslie Mann
Independence Day (India)
SummerSlam (2017)
J. R. R. Tolkien
Trevor Noah
Trainspotting (film)
Medal of Honor
German Empire
Capital punishment
2024 Summer Olympics
James Cameron
Pink Floyd
Nasty Gal
The Last Supper (Leonardo da Vinci)
Dab (dance)
Barbiturate
Angkor Wat
Boeing 777
New Kids on the Block
Hip hop music
Daniel Day-Lewis
Pope Francis
Sarah Jessica Parker
Fridtjof Nansen
Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals
Artemis
Oxygen
Mary-Kate Olsen
Raw (film)
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
Jessica Jones (TV series)
Backlash (2017)
Nineteen Eighty-Four
Ray Donovan
Chris Rock
24: Legacy
Mandy Moore
Eva Ekeblad
Murder of James Bulger
List of Black Mirror episodes
Carla Gugino
Oxycodone
List of Family Guy episodes
Rana Daggubati
Pretty Little Liars (season 7)
The Walking Dead (TV series)
Nigeria
It Comes at Night
Eva Mendes
Family Guy
Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother
Jessica Simpson
The Vampire Diaries
Rani Padmini
Dancing with the Stars (U.S. season 24)
Kajol
Sam Smith (singer)
Maggie Smith
Brie Larson
Psychology
Colony (TV series)
Nike, Inc.
Forest Whitaker
Faith Hill
Speed of light
Bates Motel (TV series)
Ray Charles
Jennifer Lopez
Batman
Jesse Plemons
Amelia Earhart
Andy Samberg
Micropenis
Null
Stephanie McMahon
Technology
The Mick (TV series)
Ridley Scott
Korean War
Synesthesia
Sachin: A Billion Dreams
Jackfruit
Sri Lanka
Odell Beckham Jr.
Aung San Suu Kyi
Alec Baldwin
Jason Isaacs
Carl Sagan
Alien: Covenant
Sean Connery
Caffeine
Cape Verde
Isis
Rogue One
Moon Lovers: Scarlet Heart Ryeo
FIFA Confederations Cup
Prison Break
Arnold Schwarzenegger
Sally Yates
Neoliberalism
Chickenpox
Boeing 747
TIPS: To create new content for your website or blog...
  1. Enter the title of a Wikipedia article in the box above.
  2. Select your options using the checkboxes, or use default settings.
  3. Click the 'go' button to retrieve the article.
  4. Click the 'Copy Code' button to copy the source code of the article to your clipboard.
  5. Paste the source code into your favorite HTML editor.
  6. Edit the content to suit your needs.
  7. Publish your new content to your website or blog.
  8. IMPORTANT: Before publishing, be sure to make significant changes to avoid creating duplicate content.
buy this site
Custom Website Development